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FoodConsumption

Hello Breeders,

I was asked by several Horse breeders about the food and salt consumption and the units we are counting. It looks like that topic is not addressed completely in our manual, so I try to explain what we realised:

Food is a thing that is consumed over time. Horse consume 1 unit of food per hour, which is balanced by eating up the same amount of food units from a nearby Horse Food.

One of the changes we will have in the next minor script version update is, that Horse that have been absent in the inventory for a while consume the necessary amount of Food when they are rezzed again (not when attached for riding).

Salt is working different. Mature Horse lick the salt to increase their feral percentage. When it is lower than the amount of 100% required for mating it is increased each hour by licking 2 units of salt from a nearby Horse Salt. That way they reach re required feral level within ~2 days (50 hours).

The main difference to Food is that Salt is not consumed constantly over time, but in total in the mating act.

So the calculation is very easy: to breed one foal you need 200 units of Salt - 100 units for the mother and 100 units for the father. It is "consumed" in the moment of the mating when the female Horse becomes pregnant and the male horse is spent and his feral goes down to 0% again.

So how much Salt would you need in a month to breed as many Horses as possible?

Lets calculate it with the "normal" pack Horses: 3 female and 1 male horse.

Each female needs 2 days to feral and 5 days pregnancy = seven days to breed a foal. In one month she might breed four foals and consumes 400 units of salt.

The male Horses requires 100 units for each mating, i.e. also 400 units of Salt.

With three females the consumption is simply multiplied with 3. The female Horses consume 1200 units and breed 12 foals, and the male horse needs another 1200 units (the perfect timing of course assumed). So 2400 units would be the overall consumption if everything is running optimal.

I hope, this could clarify the topic a bit. If not, just ask one of the staff members of contact me for clarification.

Your Horse Whisperer,
Jenni Eales